Surgery FAQ

Surgery FAQs: Declaws

Should I have my cat declawed?
Only you can answer this question. If you have small children, other pets, or elderly people living in your home it may be a good idea to help prevent them from being accidentally injured by your cat. Some rental agencies require that your cat be declawed before renting to you. We believe that if done with appropriate technique, appropriate pain medication, and at the optimum time cats handle declaw surgery well with few post-operative problems.

When can I have my cat declawed?
We can safely declaw kittens as early as 10-12 weeks of age. From our experience younger kittens recover from the surgery very quickly. Many people wait to do the declaw surgery until it is time to spay or neuter their kitten. This is a fine time also. Declaw surgery in cats older than 2-3 years is more difficult and there is more discomfort for the pet, but we can do it in cases where it is necessary for the quality of life of the pet and its owner.

How long does my cat have to stay in the hospital after declaw surgery?
We recommend having your cat stay in the hospital for 2 nights after declaw surgery. This allows him or her to have two full days of cage rest following surgery, which in our opinion helps the healing process and prevents post-operative complications like bleeding, swelling, or pain.

Spay/Neuter Information

When should my pet be spayed or neutered?
We recommend that spay/neuter surgery be performed around 5-6 months of age. Although many humane societies and rescue organizations are performing early age neuters, we believe that there are health benefits in allowing your pet to mature more prior to being neutered or spayed.

Is my pet too old to be spayed or neutered?
No! Unless there are very specific health reasons that would keep your pet from tolerating anesthesia or surgery, there is no upper age restriction to doing these surgeries. In many cases, such as breast tumors, prostate disease, or uterine infections, these surgeries are life saving. We strongly recommend having non-breeding pets altered in order to prevent these serious and common health problems.

General Surgery FAQs

Does my pet need to stay overnight after surgery?
In cases of abdominal surgery we do recommend an overnight stay. It gives your pet a chance to recuperate quietly in a safe place following an invasive surgery. Most pets just want to sleep after abdominal surgery anyway, with the benefit of post-operative pain medication. This also allows the doctor and technician to evaluate your pet in the morning prior to going home. Routine neuters, dentals, and most lump removals are fine to go home the same night.

Is there someone in the hospital at night with my pet?
No. Because we do not operate as a 24-hour intensive care hospital there is no doctor or technician on the premises at night routinely. Accordingly we charge less for an overnight stay than an intensive care hospital as well. If we feel your pet is in an unstable condition or needs nursing care overnight we will make arrangements with you to transfer your pet to an intensive care hospital. This is rarely necessary after a routine surgical procedure.

What is presurgical bloodwork and do I need to have it done before surgery?
Presurgical bloodwork is typically a blood panel that is drawn to screen your pet for unpredicted health problems that might complicate anesthesia. We routinely check liver and kidney enzyme levels, blood sugar, and protein levels. In some cases, we may recommend additional work that may be particular to your pet's medical history or surgical needs.

Does my pet need pain medication after surgery?
We strongly recommend post-operative pain medication for your pet after surgery and some dental procedures. We tailor our post-operative pain strategies to be specific for the procedure that was performed. If authorized, an injection will be given to your pet as it is waking up from anesthesia and oral medication will be dispensed to follow up at home.

New patients receive 15% OFF first visit.

Office Hours

Monday:

7:00 AM-5:30 PM

Tuesday:

7:00 AM-5:30 PM

Wednesday:

7:00 AM-5:30 PM

Thursday:

7:00 AM-5:30 PM

Friday:

7:00 AM-5:30 PM

Saturday:

7:00 AM-1:00 PM

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Testimonials

  • "Dr DeChristina seems to have a real gift with felines and I enjoy taking my kitty Haley to see her when it's time for a yearly check-up. Thanks Dr D for your tender care!"
    Lucy H.

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